Angry Birds-Black Birds-Squirrels

Angry Birds: I wrote a post a long while back now about my neighbors next door who, not knowing their names, I call Mr. and Mrs. Elderly. In that post I talked about their affinity for feeding the birds and the multiple bird feeders that they have hanging where I can see them from my kitchen window. I enjoy watching the birds if they are feeding when I’m at the sink doing dishes, etc. Recently, Mr. Elderly bought three new birdfeeders that are very different than the long vertical tubes he has always had. These look like little houses and have multiple feeding ‘stations’ along each of the sides. Now I get to watch my own version of Angry Birds, because several of the regulars come down from the pine tree and use their wings in a flapping motion to make a bird already there feeding move away. What’s weird to me is that it isn’t because that bird wants that feeding spot as, more often than not, they just sit there until that bird has gone back into the tree and then they take off again. I’ve made up the story in my head when I see it happen now that the flapping bird is the grown-up and they are making a fuss much like a parent would say, “Get out of the fridge! It’s not time to eat yet!”

Plenty of room for everyone to share!

Black Birds: There are a few larger, black birds who enjoy the feed that is provided in this area. Their bodies are much too large for them to comfortably perch on the feeders and eat, but they seem quite content with the amount of birdseed on the ground underneath the feeders. It seems like they always arrive between 3 PM and 4 PM, so I’ve determined that they must be senior citizens, choosing to arrive for the “early bird special”. (Yes, pun intended!)

Only 3 and 20 more and I’ll have enough for a pie!

Squirrels: The squirrels who live in that tree (I’ve only seen two at the most at the same time) are very unhappy about these new birdfeeders. They’d found a way, with energy and effort, to get themselves up to one of the vertical feeders and prop themselves in a way that allowed them to partake of the offerings within. They have not yet figured out how to scale these new feeders, and so they have had to settle for the birdfeed that has dropped to the ground. Every so often, one of them tries some amazing acrobatic twists of the body to try and get into a position where it can access the feed. It makes me wish that I was technologically savvy enough to use my phone and record a video – a picture is worth a thousand words. Even after the black birds have had their fill, there is still plenty of birdseed on the ground, and I wonder why the squirrels work so hard to get at the feeders when they could easily eat from the seed on the ground. I can only assume that they want their meals “fresh from the feeder”. Picky eaters!!!

Stretching is always supposed to do a body good, after all!

Many of the birds do not ‘fly south’ for the winter, so there is activity to be seen at these feeders all year. I’ve watched them in all kinds of weather, and it seems like they like the hot weather the least, since most of them are at the feeders early and don’t spend time there otherwise. But you know what? It’s actually quite a pretty picture when you stand still and watch snowflakes fall on the birds while they partake of some food.